Recent news and thoughts
RECENT THOUGHT
June 18, 2021
Why the rich fear red traffic lights
At first sight, red traffic lights appear to have little to do with concerns about socioeconomic inequality. Looking at them more closely, however, may change this. In 2020, ...

I am Tijo Salverda, a Dutch working as Professor of Social and Cultural Anthropology at the University of Vienna, Austria.

I began my studies in World History, Non-Western History, at the Erasmus University Rotterdam. Subsequently, I commenced a Ph.D. in Social and Cultural Anthropology at the VU University Amsterdam, the Netherlands (which I defended in 2010). After teaching at various Dutch universities, I joined the Human Economy Programme at the University of Pretoria, South Africa, from 2012 to 2014. Upon return to Europe, I joined the University of Cologne’s Global South Studies Center from 2014 through 2019. Since early 2019, I am based at the University of Vienna’s Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology.

My research focuses on elites and corporate actors, particularly how they perceive and respond to counter-power. Equally of importance in my research are geopolitics, (global) finance, political economy, and the study of economic behaviour from an anthropological perspective. I have conducted previous and ongoing research in sites across Mauritius, Zambia, South Africa, the Netherlands, France, and Germany.

Recent Publications
2021
 • Peer Reviewed Articles

Multi-scalar moral economy: Global agribusiness, rural Zambian residents, and the distributed crowd. Focaal 89: 79-92.

www.berghahnjournals.com
2021
 • Other Publications

Land Grabbing und seine KritikerInnen: Ein Fallbeispiel in Sambia. In: Karin Fischer, Christian Reiner and Cornelia Staritz (eds.). Globale Warenketten und ungleiche Entwicklung: Arbeit, Kapital, Konsum, Natur. Vienna: Mandelbaum.

2020
 • Other Publications

Tales of Inequality: What Piketty, Rousseau, Scrooge McDuck, and the Devil may have in common (winner essay prize What is the future of inequality among people, and how can it be changed by social and cultural practice? University of Cologne; with Florian Willems).

See here